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Natur Cymru Natur Cymru
Issue 31

Issue 31

Summer 2009

Earlier this year the National Trust hosted a celebratory exhibition of the work of Charles Tunnicliffe, which included a talk about the great wildlife artist by Philip Snow. Tunnicliffe’s paintings and illustrations in more than 250 books won him a huge following, but perhaps not the artistic acclaim he deserved. As Philip pointed out, dead birds, which are relatively easy to depict, can be art, but capturing life itself, so hard, is considered mere illustration by the art world.

Issue 30

Issue 30

Spring 2009

Welsh islands and their seabird colonies have long attracted outstanding research talent. The fascination they exert has helped to keep researchers committed to long-term studies, which over time become important evidence of the causes and effects of environmental change. We all benefit, not because these studies generate income for local communities, although they do, but because they enhance our reputation as a rewarding place to do research; richly endowed with nature, ours is a country where learning counts, a culture sympathetic to the pursuit of knowledge and understanding.

Issue 29

Issue 29

Winter 2008

Seven years ago a new blueprint for our woodlands was launched. Called Woodlands for Wales, it promised to be a 50-year strategy for trees and woodlands. After only seven years, the vision has become opaque enough to require a revamp and a further consultation exercise, which finished in October. The policy needed to catch up with other policy changes, such as the Assembly’s Environment Strategy and One Wales document, and the rising importance of Climate Change.

Issue 28

Issue 28

Autumn 2008

How much do you value nature? As individuals we can probably answer that, but what about industry, councils, nations? Business would have us believe that nature only has an economic value when it is a commodity for people to use, but what if this is no longer true? This Autumn issue highlights how we need to reassess our thinking.

Issue 27

Issue 27

Summer 2008

Biodiversity conservation often boils down to identifying what is special and trying to maintain it in situ. The best way of conserving wildlife is to provide it with an environment rich in opportunities.

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