We use cookies to provide you with the best experience on our website. No personal information is stored. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on the website. Please refer to our privacy statement for further information on our cookies.



Natur Cymru

Issue 07

Trees make air

What has happened to the knowledge about trees, wildlife and the good things which nature can provide, which children once absorbed through their mothers' milk? STEPHEN BRISTOW reflects on the implications of our modern lives, disconnected from nature, and how, even on the farm, children have little to feed their appetite for practical knowledge about natural materials and the ways of the countryside.

Back to Top

Issue 07

In their element – coastal otters in north Wales

After a period of rapid decline, otters are making a comeback. A group of dedicated otter-watchers have been charting their progress, and finding that marine fish feature on the otters' menu. As CHRIS HALL and KATE WILLIAMSON report, otters are not averse to a spot of sea fishing.

Back to Top

Issue 07

The mysterious Welsh sorbs

The whitebeam, rowan and service trees belong to the genus Sorbus, of which Wales has its own endemics. PATRICK ROPER explores the historical and cultural significance of these wondrous trees, the bearers of cherished fruits, which link us to the world of Monks and Druids.

Back to Top

Issue 07

Food shopping with the environment in mind

As consumers, we are just beginning to make the connection between the food we buy and the environment we want. Better food can mean a better environment. One initiative is doing much to show the practical benefits which flow when the environment is part of the deal which the farmers offers the consumer. In Wales these benefits include a re-activated farming advisory service, as GLENDA THOMAS reports.

Back to Top

Natur Cymru

The Lore of Plants: bracken and reader response!

A look at an article about bracken by ROLANT WILLIAMS in a community newspaper this time, and a taste of the feedback received from readers to one or two articles under this title.

This article is written in Welsh. A translation is available on request.

Back to Top

Natur Cymru

The conservation of fritillary butterflies

The beauty of the fritillary butterflies is sadly matched by their scarcity. The race is on to find out just what conditions they require, and to manage their remaining sites to provide these conditions. Here RUSSELL HOBSON reports on work to conserve the two most endangered species, and describes the three species with which they may be confused.

Back to Top

Natur Cymru

Pontbren Rural Care Project

Here ALWYN HUGHES describes how ten north Powys farmers came together to discuss the future of their farms and their environment in general. And the result? A new and exciting co-operative agri-environmental scheme.

This article is written in Welsh. A translation is available on request.

Back to Top

Natur Cymru

Farmers unite for community and environment

A home-made, grass-roots, agri-environment scheme. Where farmers have chosen to work together to benefit the local community and environment, is turning heads. Could this be the way of the future, asks CLIVE FAULKNER?

Back to Top

Natur Cymru

Getting it locally – food initiatives in Powys

One way that farmers and growers can compete in a global food market, to the benefit of local economy, the environment and the consumer, is by providing fresh, flavoursome local food. Are you getting it locally? RICHARD PITTS describes local food initiatives in Powys.

Back to Top

Natur Cymru

Cardigan Bay and its conservation importance

Given the innate appeal of seabirds, dolphins and whales, it is no wonder that the special beauty of Cardigan Bay has come to prominence recently. The efforts of many dedicated individuals are starting to reveal the scale of the Bay's importance, but there is much still to discover, as MICK GREEN and MARK SIMMONDS report.

Back to Top