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Natur Cymru

Issue 38 Spring 2011

Read inside...

Heathland Beef brings heaths alive

The Cig Tir Comin–Pembrokeshire Heathland Beef scheme is providing a new opportunity for farmers and heathland managers in Pembrokeshire to work together. ANDREW TUDDENHAM takes up the story.

Skylark (c) RSPB Andy Hay

Conserving nature in the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park

Pembrokeshire has a coastline of exceptional natural beauty, and has the only National Park in Britain established mainly for its spectacular coast, set up nearly 60 years ago. Nature has influenced culture in this far western land, and has also brought millions of visitors, helping to sustain communities. MIKE HOWE describes how the Park is tackling the job of sustaining nature.

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Marloes Sands (c) Mike Alexander

The Marloes Peninsula

Many people cross the finger of land that points to Skomer Island intent on an island experience, unaware of the charms of this peninsula which is itself almost surrounded by sea. Yet there are great walks and lots of wildlife here, thanks to innovative projects by farmers and conservation bodies, as MATT SUTTON and ANDREW TUDDENHAM describe.

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Risso's dolphin (c) Oliver Yates

The Charming Risso’s dolphins of the Welsh Seas

Year after year, the Welsh coast attracts thousands of visitors due to its breathtaking landscapes and diversity of marine life. Cetaceans are a significant attraction for many, who predominantly come in search of the famous bottlenose dolphins of Cardigan Bay. However, the charismatic Risso’s dolphin slips by largely unrecognised and undetected for many visitors. Their elusive nature is largely to blame for this, but it is time we began to appreciate these charming animals, writes PABLO LALOR.

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Kittiwakes (c) Mike Alexander

Springtime on the Pembrokeshire Coast

To breathe in the ozone-filled atmosphere of Pembrokeshire's stunning coast, and encounter its exuberant wildlife, you need to get your walking boots on. Two experienced boot-wearers, DAVID and MORAG PERROTT, take us on a tour of some favourite walks along the coastal path from its start at Poppit Sands near Cardigan in the north to the edge of Tenby in the south.

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Southern blue damselfly (c) Allan Brandon

On soft ground – damselfly conservation in Pembrokeshire

In the past, Pembrokeshire’s damselflies could rely on the incidental results of human activities, whether farming or clay-winning, to create their ideal habitat. These days their habitat is being revived in a more deliberate way, as MATT SUTTON reports.

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Snow monitoring (c) Dewi Edwards

Snowdonia’s first and last snow 1941-2010

Cymdeithas Edward Llwyd’s Llên Natur Project seeks to gather and share information about the relationship between people and their natural environment. By visiting the Llên Natur website (www.llennatur.com) you can download or add to 35,000 diary entries dating from the last two and a half centuries and earlier. They mainly relate to the weather, agriculture and the environment. These entries include contributions from people who have kept private records and are willing to share their data with the Project. Here LES LARSEN, one of those diligent recorders, and DUNCAN BROWN, the Llên Natur Project co-ordinator, discuss snow records over the last 70 years.

This article is written in Welsh. A translation is available on request.

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Greater Horseshoe bat (c) Bob Haycock

A changing landscape for greater horseshoe bats in Pembrokeshire

BOB HAYCOCK looks back over the last 30 years at how a breeding colony of greater horseshoe bats in mid Pembrokeshire has managed to adapt to a changing environment and alterations to its roost – formerly a stable block, now a hotel and restaurant.

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